Beaches in Málaga

      

    

Málaga has 15 beaches spread over 20km

Guide to the beaches of Málaga

Let's start by being completely honest: Malaga beaches are not known for being the best on the Costa del Sol. But the town has some good sandy beaches within easy reach of the town center. And best of all, this is a destination that allows you to combine world-class museums, sightseeing and great shopping with a trip to the beach.


Malaga's various beaches have something for everyone. Beaches for families with children, for long walks, for being alone, for a sunset cocktail, and for nudists. Please note that each beach has limited capacity. You can check the conditions in advance via the website Aforo Costa del Sol , which also tells you the temperature and wind speed. In addition, there is a jellyfish warning. Lifeguards operate on the beaches on the weekends between Easter and October, and daily in July and August. If there is a red flag on the beach, stay out of the water (a green flag means conditions are safe, a yellow flag means be careful). 

Most local beach guests bring their own parasol and find a free space as close to the beach edge as possible. If you want this, you can buy an umbrella in one of the beach kiosks or grocery stores on the beach promenade. We would recommend renting sun loungers with parasols at one of the many beach bars. The price for renting deck chairs starts at approx. 4 € for two sun loungers with parasol. Sun loungers in the front row can be somewhat more expensive.  


Playa de la Malagueta
(the closest beach to downtown)


La Malagueta, which is the most popular beach in Málaga, and the most crowded, is also the easiest to reach from the center (about 10-15 minutes walk). The view of cruise ships in Malaga harbor is good from here. In the afternoon, this beach is less interesting for sun worshipers, as tall buildings cast shade over the beach. The beach is not shallow, and you are quickly out in deep water when you swim. 

There are lifeguards, children's playgrounds, cafes and bars on the seafront, and several beach restaurants. 

Playa de la Malagueta
Playa de la Malagueta

Playa La Caleta 

(the best beach for a relaxed atmosphere)


The kilometer-long sandy beach next to La Malagueta beach is the widest beach near the center. This is where beach tourism began in Malaga at the end of the nineteenth century. Sports enthusiasts can use the exercise equipment on the boulevard set up here. Be aware that the beach is not shallow, so you quickly end up in deep water.

There are lifeguards all year round, playgrounds for children and some restaurants on the seafront. 

Playa La Caleta
Playa La Caleta

Playa de los Baños del Carmen 
(the best beach for a sunset cocktail)

   
Not much of a beach - the rocky bay has room for only a few towels, but the bar and restaurant next to El Balneario is a great place for a drink, snack or a meal with the waves clapping for your feet. There is an old pavilion on the beach. The pavilion may look a bit run-down, but at the same time it is the charm. There are great views of Malaga harbor and the city, but most of all it is a wonderful place to watch the sunset.
No lifeguards operate on this beach.

Playa de los Baños del Carmen
Playa de los Baños del Carmen

El Palo og Pedregalejo 
(
the best beaches for families & fried fish) 


The old fishing districts of El Palo and Pedregalejo 5km east of the center have some of the most family-friendly beaches in Málaga. These sandy beaches consist of a number of small coves, offering safe, shallow swimming. It can quickly get quite full of families with children in the summer and on warmer weekends.
Lifeguards operate on this beach during the summer season. The atmosphere here is very cozy. The beach has many bars, restaurants, kiosks, and several playgrounds for children.

El Palo og Pedregalejo
El Palo og Pedregalejo

Playa del Peñón del Cuervo                 

(the best beach for sunrises)


Named after the large black stone in the middle, which may look a bit like a crow, this is the first beach on the eastern part of Malaga. This beach is great for sunrises and is quiet most of the year.
No lifeguards operate on this beach and there are no bars or restaurants, so you have to bring food and drink. The best way to get there is to walk (one hour) or cycle (30 minutes) from Málaga city center. 

Playa del Peñón del Cuervo
Playa del Peñón del Cuervo

Playa de la Misericordia
(the best beach for families)  


The largest beach in Malaga (2 km long), is located at the western end of the town. La Misericordia is popular with locals. Swimming is safer at the western end where the beach slopes gently into the sea.

Lifeguards operate on this beach. There are playgrounds for children, kiosks, bars, cafes and ice cream parlors as well as a good selection of beach restaurants. 

Playa de la Misericordia
Playa de la Misericordia

Playa del Guadalhorce
(the best beach to be alone) 


Supported by the Guadalhorce nature reserve (a great place for bird watching in Málaga), this is without a doubt the quietest beach in Málaga, and there is plenty of space even in the summer. The beach shelves are very deep here and watch out for strong currents at each end of the sand at the estuary. Nudism is common on this beach. There are no lifeguards or other facilities on this beach.

Playa del Guadalhorce
Playa del Guadalhorce

Playa del Guadalmar / Campo del Golf 
(the best beach for long walks)


Farthest west of all the beaches in Malaga we find Guadalmar and Campo de Golf. These are two of the longest beaches on this part of the coast, quiet and unspoilt. When there is wind, local kitesurfers flock here and there are several relaxing beach bars. Malaga city's only designated nudist beach is on the left near the golf course.
In season there are lifeguards at the eastern end of Guadalmar. Several bars and restaurants at each end. 

Playa del Guadalmar / Campo del Golf
Playa del Guadalmar / Campo del Golf